The work of London-based artist Mona Hatoum (b. 1952) addresses the growing unease of an ever-expanding world that is as technologically networked as it is fractured by war and exile. Best known for sculptures that transform domestic objects such as kitchen utensils or cribs into things strange and threatening, she conducts multilayered investigations of the body, politics, and gender that express a powerful and pervasive sense of precariousness. This copiously illustrated presentation of the artist’s oeuvre offers critical and art historical essays by Michelle White and Anna C. Chave and imaginative texts by Rebecca Solnit and Adania Shibli that contextualize Hatoum’s work as well as extensive discussions on a selection of significant sculptures and installations. Published in conjunction with the artist’s first major United States exhibition in twenty years, the publication features photographs of the show installed in the Menil Collection’s renowned Renzo Piano-designed building.

This book can be purchased at the Pulitzer where the exhibition is on view through August 11, 2018. To order online, visit menilcollection.org.